The Montclair Farmers Market: A Dietitian Shares Her Must-Haves

Farmer’s markets are a great way to support local businesses, help the environment, improve your health, and get creative with your veggie dishes. Montclair Farmers Market, located at 86 Walnut Street, is filled with fresh, colorful produce. There are so many parts of the fruit and veggie people tend to toss, but it’s time to think twice before tossing it. Read on for a list of super-nutritious produce to pick up at your next Farmers Market visit.

Watermelon

  • – Watermelon is a great summer produce to keep you hydrated but many toss the rind. The rind is the white part right below the green skin. Not only can you eat it on its own, but you can toss it into a smoothie to reap the benefits. You also can pickle the rinds for a nutrient-dense side to your lunch.
  • – The benefits? The rind is jam-packed with citrulline, a compound that has been shown to help improve blood flow and circulation, leading to better blood pressure control and an athletic performance boost.  
  • – Also spotted at Montclair Farmers Market are yellow watermelons, they look identical to your typical watermelon from the outside, but deep yellow on the inside. Have kids? Cube the yellow watermelon and have them taste it and guess what produce they are having. Yellow watermelon tastes identical to red. Some may think it’s a pineapple!    
  • – More on watermelon here.

Read More: A Registered Dietitian’s Go-To Meals at Montclair Restaurants

Fennel 

Fennel 

  • – Fennel is a perfect addition to your summer bbq: toss it on the grill for a side dish, but don’t toss the stems and fronds, they’re great to add to salads and meats for garnish. Chop up the stems like you would scallions and toss them into a pasta or potato salad. Mince the fronds and add to dips, meats, and really almost any dinner dish!  
  • – The benefits? Fennel tastes like licorice and not only adds a ton of flavor but also adds a nutrient punch to your meals like potassium, vitamin C, and fiber. 
  • – More on fennel here.

Broccoli 

Broccoli

  • – Usually, you’ll only find broccoli with the stems at your typical grocery store, but Montclair Farmers Market sells broccoli intact with the leaves, which are commonly tossed. These leafy greens are just as nutrient-dense as kale and an easy quick sauté with some garlic, olive oil, and salt when you’re not sure what to make as a veggie for dinner. Don’t toss the stems! Chop them up in quarters, toss them in olive oil and salt, and roast these in your oven, or pop them into your air fryer for a crispy snack. 
  • – The benefits? The leaves are rich in vitamin K, fiber, and phytonutrients which not only help your body detoxify but also help to keep you full and regulate digestion. 
  • – More on broccoli here.

See More: Delicious Plant-Based Dishes in Montclair, According to a Local Dietitian

Beetroot

Beetroot

  • – Beets are a creative way to change up your weekly veg dish, but if you’re buying the whole beetroot make sure to use all its parts. Beet greens can be sauteed with olive oil and salt or tossed in the air fryer for a crispy chip. You can also pickle the stems for a crunchy snack. 
  • – The benefits? Beet greens/leaves are rich in nitrates, Vitamin K, fiber, and vitamin C. Beetroot has been shown to improve liver function and your body’s natural detoxification process, reduce inflammation, help with platelet clumping and improve exercise performance and stamina. 
  • – Also spotted at Montclair Farmers Market: golden beets.
  • – More on beets here.


Written by:

Christina Kamilaris, MS, RDN, CDN, CSSD is a registered dietitian and board-certified specialist in sports dietetics. Outside of working with students and athletes at NYU, She has a local private practice, Veggies n Spice. Covering weight concerns, medical conditions, hormone balance, sports nutrition, and more, Christina helps customize your nutrition, regain confidence, and take control of your health. On the weekends you’ll find her checking out local restaurants and markets with her husband, strolling the Brookdale park, or recipe testing new dishes and desserts.


Appears within: